Archive for the ‘Institutions’ Category

Voting, votes and honest election results are not enough to prevent elected officials from misbehaving or misgoverning once they get into office. Constitutional checks and balances are not usually sufficient enough to check and balance the activities of those in power abuses of power in the from of malfeasance, misfeasance and nonfeasance. Such abuses are hard to detect by the everyday citizens and those in government have no incentive to report them. Those who independently report such incidences quickly become “enemies of the state”. Therefore, other strong pressures and institutions are required to subject the those in power to govern well, but they must emerge from the citizens themselves or a significant number of them. Nigeria is no exception. (more…)

A Speech by Grimot Nane

Something happened yesterday. In front of the university [London South Bank University] a [visiting] research student was asking me for some directions and information. Even though he was very white he did not sound like an Englishman. So we got chatting and he asked if I had studied here. I replied yes. He then asked what I do and I told him. He then [further] asked me what exactly did I study and I told development. Not being satisfied with my answer he asked what exactly did I study. I and I said corruption. He then replied, “Ah so you are into computer science, you deal with the corruption files?” To this I asked him if he was from Scandinavia to which he agreed but wanted to know what nationality had to do with it. And I said to him “[the incidence] of corruption is so low in your country that when corruption is being mentioned you do not think about corrupt politicians, you think about corrupt computer files.” We both laughed off my last comment and we went our ways. (more…)

People when no dey happy, people when know dey look

Fela Kuti, Overtake don Overtake

Last week Ibrahim Malu, the Acting Chairman of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) was delighted to announce that its training college had graduated 183 cadet officers with 331 more to come. It was a expedient statement intended to assure Nigerians that the fight against corruption is intensifying in concrete ways. Many Nigerians reacted with smiles, emotive statements and dancing. Deja vu all over again?


Comment: Over the past six years I have written several articles about the wrongs and decadence of University Campus Grown Fraternities (UCGF) (some deleted) with insider knowledge. I more recently even developed two essay series out of them, namely, Fraternities are Viruses in Nigeria and The Leadership of a Bad Brother  (both which do not names persons or fraternities) with another series in making that does mention names.  A major international media house and a documentary film maker have even contacted me for my expertise on the matter. However, over a decade before me Omoleye Sowore (in 2002) had written one of the most important articles on the source problem of cults (UCGF) in Nigeria and its possible remedies. I am sure many readers will agree.  (more…)


Many talking points in Nigeria and diaspora are increasingly focused on the undeniable necessity for a ‘proper revolution’ to happen and soon as a singular means to decisively sort out the poly-faceted corruption and misgovernance entrenched in and withering away the country beyond recognition. Talk of revolution is good for expressing various dimensions despair. Notwithstanding, the realities of revolution are not represented in the everyday chatter of it and appear to be tacitly hiding in many brains. A thoroughgoing political revolution has a very high cost that involves mass coordination, mass murder, mass destruction and mass deception [propaganda]; are Nigerians ready for that? How possible is it really? (more…)