Archive for the ‘Leadership’ Category

The best chance of a revolution Nigeria had was initially led by young obscure student leaders at the University of Benin campus in May 1989; they staged a protest that became famously known as the “Anti-SAP Riots” spilt into Benin-City and rapidly to other cities in Nigeria including Lagos, Port Harcourt and Ibadan. The masses were firmly behind the student protesters and bought their persuasive message of obscene leadership corruption, thoroughgoing military repression and the rejection of neoliberalism that was mercilessly immiserating their way of life. The guns of the repressive military regime no longer frightened the masses, they had left nothing to lose. (more…)

 

Many talking points in Nigeria and diaspora are increasingly focused on the undeniable necessity for a ‘proper revolution’ to happen and soon as a singular means to decisively sort out the poly-faceted corruption and misgovernance entrenched in and withering away the country beyond recognition. Talk of revolution is good for expressing various dimensions despair. Notwithstanding, the realities of revolution are not represented in the everyday chatter of it and appear to be tacitly hiding in many brains. A thoroughgoing political revolution has a very high cost that involves mass coordination, mass murder, mass destruction and mass deception [propaganda]; are Nigerians ready for that? How possible is it really? (more…)

A new breakaway has emerged out of the National Association of Seadogs (NAS) recently and is known as the “Jibaluka Confraternity”. While the exact details of the Jibaluka Confraternity is yet to be released to the public, it is certain that the preponderance of ennui within NAS caused it. This ennui is generated in the way Seadogs are treated. There are expected to pay their dues like men, attend meetings like men, practice brotherhood like men, take on responsibilities like men and uphold the tenets they are oathed to uphold like men, however, it is also demanded they obey orders like little boys afraid of the cane. Zombiism of another kind. Many cannot stand it any longer. (more…)

One may wonder who within the Nigerian Ministry of Education removed History [of West Africa] as a subject from the national academic curriculum several years ago. Many have claimed that it was removed to hide the ‘darkness of the Civil War’ and to quell potential tensions. Has it worked for contemporary Nigeria? We know it has not. The Muslim-dominated North defeated Christian East in a very bloody and savage conflict and they want people to ‘forget’ by robbing people of a major component of their educational freedom? History is ultimately a reflection of the handwork of leaders and they know it. (more…)