Corruption in Nigeria: Is It Curable? Part One
| |

Corruption in Nigeria: Is It Curable? Part One

The Nigerian nation might not be a failed state but it is certainly by all ostensible standards of politics and governance a true kakistocracy. Nigeria’s condition of kakistocracy is a function of corruption and moral decadence. It is a truism to say corruption is a major societal ill in Nigeria blighting its way of life; Nigeria is a certainly bandits’ nation. Hitherto, Transparency International perennially ranked Nigeria as one of the most corrupt nations in the world for a number of years but the recent ranking of the nation as being a much less corrupt from practical experience and common sense appears at best to be dubious. Read More “Corruption in Nigeria: Is It Curable? Part One”

| | | | |

Educating a Shell Worker

Ever since ex-President Obosanjo threw the gauntlet to Nigerians in general in to prove the acts of corruption of General Babangida (rtd) (Nwaobi 2004), it has become fashionable for specially interested Nigerians to ask for proof of obvious crimes and malfeasance carried out against the nation and its people by either privileged individuals or organisations with a sole purpose i.e. the presumed impossibility of individuals to provide the proof asked for. That is a very delusional precedent for Nigerians to uncritically follow since in reality there is abundant proof of Babangida’s acts of corruption. Read More “Educating a Shell Worker”

Eradicating Ecocide: A Review
| |

Eradicating Ecocide: A Review

Ecocide eradication as both a concept and an institution of (enforceable) international (and local) application is creating a popular stir of concern for its critics and enthusiasm for its supporters; respectively. It is going to get more serious as the ascendance of both its acceptance and the resistance to it unfold. Acceptance often takes time, and resistance wears out with time so that time will decide the fate of ecocide law as a legitimate institution.

Read More “Eradicating Ecocide: A Review”

Good for the People, Good for Everybody
|

Good for the People, Good for Everybody

Lawrence Cook in The Spy Who Sat On The Doorstep (Courtesy IMDB)

I remember from the mid to late 70s, Sacro Ogban, a cool, sociable, and trendy guy I admired for his personality and style. About 12 years older than me, he was light-skinned and had a close resemblance to Larry Cook, star of the movie, The Spook Who Sat At The Doorstep and a similar persona. Sacro would always make a toast at some stage during drinking sessions with his friends, a regular event. The wording of the toast was constant, said with a hint of a Harlem, New York accent, “That which is good for the people is good for everybody” or sometimes “What is good for the people is good for everybody”; he used the latter version more often. The meaning or context of the toast was obscure to me but always met with effortless acceptance from his friends. Yes, the toast made little sense to my preteen mind, but it was catchy. In 1978, he left Orerokpe, where both our parents lived and went overseas for studies. Read More “Good for the People, Good for Everybody”