The Portrait of a Nigerian Druggie Youth

Take a very good look at the photograph. In the photograph, you can see the portrait of a young teenager in a blue T-shirt (the Boy in blue) attempting to light up a reefer. He is closely surrounded by peers eager for him to do it because if he does they can too. There is some apparent awe for the Boy in blue by his mates; he is their leader by choice or nature. He is not from a privileged background and neither are his peers but they look up to him. Leaders instinctively know their followers expect them to be first movers and hardly back down. With the provision of privilege or means, he could be a future captain of industry, senator, Anglican bishop, colonel, principal or publisher. Who knows? What will be the use of the Boy in blues’ leadership appearance or qualities in the present and future Nigeria society? Who exactly is the Boy in blue and where can he be found?

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The Important Lesson from #FasholaGate: Faceless, Nameless and Objectless

Faceless2

Usually, corruption scandals in Nigeria are typically “nameless” and “faceless” after the fact. The best’ name and face’ a member of public or even a prosecutor usually gets are that of an individual(s) who acts as a ‘representative’ for any given scandal that covers if not ignores the names and faces of the numerous other individuals that co-participated in the act. Is such not like dying for the corruption of all one’s followers? However, it is one primary reason why corruption persists in Nigeria.

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