Comment: Over the past six years I have written several articles about the wrongs and decadence of University Campus Grown Fraternities (UCGF) (some deleted) with insider knowledge. I more recently even developed two essay series out of them, namely, Fraternities are Viruses in Nigeria and The Leadership of a Bad Brother  (both which do not names persons or fraternities) with another series in making that does mention names.  A major international media house and a documentary film maker have even contacted me for my expertise on the matter. However, over a decade before me Omoleye Sowore (in 2002) had written one of the most important articles on the source problem of cults (UCGF) in Nigeria and its possible remedies. I am sure many readers will agree.  Read the rest of this entry »

The best chance of a revolution Nigeria had was initially led by young obscure student leaders at the University of Benin campus in May 1989; they staged a protest that became famously known as the “Anti-SAP Riots” spilt into Benin-City and rapidly to other cities in Nigeria including Lagos, Port Harcourt and Ibadan. The masses were firmly behind the student protesters and bought their persuasive message of obscene leadership corruption, thoroughgoing military repression and the rejection of neoliberalism that was mercilessly immiserating their way of life. The guns of the repressive military regime no longer frightened the masses, they had left nothing to lose. Read the rest of this entry »

 

Many talking points in Nigeria and diaspora are increasingly focused on the undeniable necessity for a ‘proper revolution’ to happen and soon as a singular means to decisively sort out the poly-faceted corruption and misgovernance entrenched in and withering away the country beyond recognition. Talk of revolution is good for expressing various dimensions despair. Notwithstanding, the realities of revolution are not represented in the everyday chatter of it and appear to be tacitly hiding in many brains. A thoroughgoing political revolution has a very high cost that involves mass coordination, mass murder, mass destruction and mass deception [propaganda]; are Nigerians ready for that? How possible is it really? Read the rest of this entry »

Numerous factors are acutely responsible for the persistence and worsening of the phenomenon of corruption in many so-called democracies. These factors include regulatory capture, lack of transparency, inappropriate political systems, vertical policy transplantations, weak rule of law, harsh economic conditions, the absence of political legitimacy etc. All these factors tend to be invisible to the general public and require scandal to known. Another important factor in the growth of corruption is the much less talked about “guilty accuser syndrome”. The guilty accuser syndrome is a sophisticated political selection strategy that ensures that only politicians with “dirty hands” can get into positions of power that are both strategic and lucrative. Such a syndrome is more associated with new and transition democracies than mature liberal version. The guilty accuser syndrome is a major weapon of corrupt political patrons since it can ruin strong institutions and render institutional reform useless. Read the rest of this entry »

Video  —  Posted: July 16, 2017 in Corruption, Governance, Government, Institutions, Justice, Leadership
Tags: , , , , , , ,