Nigeria has path-dependently or even habitually allowed bad leaders and kakistocrats to enter positions of power and govern it either by means of coup d’etas or fraudulent ballots with relative ease and the resultant dissatisfaction is left to be managed by even worse leaders. The cycle of bad leader to bad leader to worse leader has thus become a solidly stable equilibrium in the nation, escaping it seems unlikely. Most Nigerians wonder endlessly how this habit can be broken or bad elections ended in order for good leaders to come into power and foster best governance possible in the society. All by itself this is a very mistaken expectation. Read the rest of this entry »

A Speech by Grimot Nane

Something happened yesterday. In front of the university [London South Bank University] a [visiting] research student was asking me for some directions and information. Even though he was very white he did not sound like an Englishman. So we got chatting and he asked if I had studied here. I replied yes. He then asked what I do and I told him. He then [further] asked me what exactly did I study and I told development. Not being satisfied with my answer he asked what exactly did I study. I and I said corruption. He then replied, “Ah so you are into computer science, you deal with the corruption files?” To this I asked him if he was from Scandinavia to which he agreed but wanted to know what nationality had to do with it. And I said to him “[the incidence] of corruption is so low in your country that when corruption is being mentioned you do not think about corrupt politicians, you think about corrupt computer files.” We both laughed off my last comment and we went our ways. Read the rest of this entry »

Knowing that one is living with oppression is a blessing whenever it decides to come, not knowing is a curse that will forever leave one much worse off. – G Nane

Before attempting to answer a few interesting questions arising from readers of the article Oppression as a Test: A Metaphor for the Nigerian Youth (, it is important to explain a simple taxonomy of oppression.

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A photograph of Hon Evance Ivwurie, Delta State legislator, appeared on Facebook a couple of years ago that uncannily emitted a tangible glimmer of hope out from the groundswell of the intractable political despair that grips Nigeria. The photograph showed Ivwurie vigorously searching for Fulani Herdsmen menacing the area, completely unarmed in the bush of Abraka (Delta State) with the unassailable expression of much physical energy, genuine indignation, utter fearlessness and a hint of finality. This article not another declamation about terror of Fulani Herdsmen in Nigeria but grounds for the possibility of a necessary shift in the attitudes of elected officials towards adopting “Toe-to-Toe politics”. Read the rest of this entry »

Alagba Aligbi: Yankiomelogbish! How now? You self na hard man O! Person no dey see your headlight again. Are you okay?

Yankius: Gba Gbi,nothing do me. Anytime I see you na something you find come. Can I help you?

Alagba Aligbi: I been dey go my father-in-law 60tth birthday, I just branch to see you. The man has tried for me. Ehe! You dey Ogbons?

Yankius: Wetin be Ogbons? Read the rest of this entry »