ceremonial

The Ontology of the African VII: Play and Wound

The Ontology of the African VII: Play and Wound

If a leader or intellectual is not articulating the values and necessities of robust human pride to his people, he or she is a dangerous traitor unworthy of the position – Guynes

The ontology of the African unfortunately involves ‘senseless play’ to perpetuate it as derisory, and it is becoming more visible due to social media; it has always been that way. The upliftment of the African people is what is necessary for our ontology not play. The instrumental aspects of the social organisation of things get works done while ceremonial aspects embellish what is available. For a society to work well, the instrumental aspects should supersede the ceremonial ones. When the reverse is the case conspicuous ceremony become a prime societal goal in itself. The ceremonial can be solemn, but it is mostly dominated by play.

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The Near Death Experience of a Petite Man
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The Near Death Experience of a Petite Man

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Tomos was a petite man in his 40s and could easily pass for a young teenager sometimes. His physical size, clothing size, and facial neoteny made sure of that. He dressed smartly in formal attire always. Perhaps, it was a ploy to look much older than his boyish appearance. Tomos was on his way to revel with friends at a housewarming party in Walworth, South East London. Walking for nearly two hours nonstop and tired, should suggest his effort to reach the party.

Though dressed like a toff, with an elegant black suit, shiny shoes, a gold-red cravat, and sporting a clean haircut, he could not afford transport fares. His masked intention of attending the party was pridictably ‘financial edification.’ Some define it as seeking loans he would never pay back and cash gifts. Tomos as he was, had mastered the art of person-to-person persuasion of a mercenary kind. But he was no street hustler. He associated with professional and intellectual types who were too embarrassed to rebuff him. Kpeuna, the party’s host, was a generous and sometimes extravagant guy. It was going to be a grand night for him. Read More “The Near Death Experience of a Petite Man”