Posts Tagged ‘ethnicity’

 

Many talking points in Nigeria and diaspora are increasingly focused on the undeniable necessity for a ‘proper revolution’ to happen and soon as a singular means to decisively sort out the poly-faceted corruption and misgovernance entrenched in and withering away the country beyond recognition. Talk of revolution is good for expressing various dimensions despair. Notwithstanding, the realities of revolution are not represented in the everyday chatter of it and appear to be tacitly hiding in many brains. A thoroughgoing political revolution has a very high cost that involves mass coordination, mass murder, mass destruction and mass deception [propaganda]; are Nigerians ready for that? How possible is it really? (more…)

To be in a UCGF (University Campus Grown Fraternity) as a member in 2017 under the terms and conditions they are currently operated is to voluntarily be a slave unless you are a “Slave Master” or his favoured client. The fight to be a slave master is the goal of many an unwitting ambitious UCGF member but where does it get them? (See: Climbing the “Fraternity Ladder”: Ambitions, Wickedness and Nothingness http://wp.me/p1bOKH-zC).

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Whether university campus grown fraternities (UCGF) have done either good or evil to societies in their countries of origin (e.g. the USA) is debatable. American-style, without idealisation, their “honour codes” are both formidable and strictly adhered; “honour” among brothers matter inestimably. Interestingly, their Nigerian imitators as ‘free-for-all fraternities’ are observably oblivious to very meaning of honour and devoid of working honour codes. This may be the reason UCGFs in Nigeria are more like “street gangs” than collectives of educated men. (more…)

I am told I cannot understand the problems in Nigeria or the challenges facing President Goodluck Jonathan because I am not “on the ground”. Is the psyche of some Nigerians that backward? I do not have to be on the ground in China assess their enormous economic growth or Greece to evaluate their economic decline or Norway to verify their high levels of good governance or Sudan to prove their high levels of misgovernance. But when it comes to Nigeria I have to be firmly on the ground. (more…)