Sapele’s Alarming Youth Drug Addiction Epidemic.

According to a competent and concerned eyewitness Ejorheya Brighoademo, a governance professional and works in the tourism and entertainment industry in Sapele, the incidence of drug addiction is conservatively 50% of the entire teenage population of the town! That is a whole generation afflicted with a destructive scourge. Incredible! How did Sapele, a major town in Delta State, Nigeria give into the drugs scourge?

A SMALL HISTORY

In the 1970s Sapele had a thriving port, was home to African Timber & Plywood – the largest timber exporting firm in the world, had a large flour mill, a number of good schools, several well-sized employers and the state support services required by a densely populated big town. Everyone tried to shop at Kingsway Stores. Sapele was also home to two notorious slums [Ugwanja and Urban Area] despite the semblance of a prosperous town. The economy of Sapele has since declined, unemployment rates are high and an alarming drug addiction epidemic among the youth of the town threatens to get worse by the day. Continue reading

Buhari Should Sell the Nigerian Youth as Slaves

President Buhari like many past Nigerian heads of state are living proof of why slavery flourished along the coast of West Africa a few centuries ago. While the Europeans, Americans and others sought their youth to build the edifices that have come to symbolise civilisation and world power, many African kings never had any use for their proliferating population of youths. Today is no different. Diaspora is the dreamland of the Nigerian youth. Under Buhari’s administration, the incentive for the Nigerian youth to go overseas for a better life has never been greater because lack of opportunities that stare them in the face. If leaders have no respect or value for their youth, who will?

It is the height of laziness for a national leader to have no constructive use for a youth. It is why people deal with negative racism daily as a rule, slavery. When African leaders start to have good use for their youth, Africans may just become more than honorary human beings to other races.

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Did Wole Soyinka Really Blame the Nigerian Youth?

Recently, Wole Soyinka has been credited with stating in a speech or article titled “Where Did We Go Wrong?” stating a list of the very youthful ages of the Nigerian leaders and pioneers in the immediate post-colonial era. The wordings then goes on to venerate the colonial youth of as men of vision and ability. I very strongly doubt that Wole Soyinka either said such a thing in public or wrote it. If he did he must have gravely overlooked the realities and context that produced the very youthful leaders and pioneers of Nigeria’s past, which he is one. Nigeria’s youthful leaders, therein hailed, have left the country a insuperable legacy of misgovernance, corruption, polarisation and disaster. What is the fuss about Nigeria’s bungling first leaders? Continue reading

A Response to “#30PercentOrNothing”

http://opinionriver.com/30percentornothing/

Be bold for the children of everybody and look well! It will improve our judging tomorrow” – Dan Bearman in Therefore Be Bold (by Herbert Gold)

The young do not know enough to be prudent, and therefore they attempt the impossible and achieve it, generation after generation”. – Pearl S Buck

I support the 30PercentOrNothing movement and like its logic of participation; if the youth do not get involved in politics as voters and especially candidates they have only themselves to blame. I will rather be wrong than dismiss real and necessary potential if I can identify it or be persuaded to it. I am not naïve enough to believe the movement will succeed in its mission but I am giving it a fair chance of success. Continue reading

The Ontology of the African II: The Youth

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The derisory ontology of the African has not gone unchallenged. At the forefront, artists, intellectuals, academics, civil society leaders, freedom fighters, politicians etc. particularly of African descent have chosen innumerable paths and approaches to reversing or negating the derisory ontology of the African in order to produce a more if not thoroughly positive one. Students, synonymous with youth, appear to be most overwhelming group of Africans that are most willing, able, qualified and equipped to challenge the African ontology in the mainstream. How are these young students and scholar faring? Continue reading

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