What Pirate-Captain Entities Should Be Doing for Democracy

There is a keen fascination among young men particularly at leading schools and universities around the world with the “captain-pirate” mode of rebellion or disobedience against the injustices and excesses of the status quo in society. This is not surprising. While the literal meaning of a pirate and the piratical life is one of thieves and the means of thieving, respectively, its meaning in the context of fraternal orders of young men is consanguineous with the metaphor of Robin Hood – stealing from the rich or powerful to give to the poor or weak. The young or seasoned pirate, as he solemnly swears at his initiation, under the direction of his captain is thus necessarily an agent of social justice in society. The evolution of the captain-pirate mode of fraternal organisation has failed in Nigeria to remain relevant, even facing obsolescence and has become no better a than a ship that lost its rudder, ripped its sails and steered by the mercy of the tides and winds of the sea. This is tragic since more and more competent actors and voices are needed to help Nigeria’s struggling democracy mature with the hands of the masses holding it. But how have captain-pirate groups in other parts of the world remained very potent political entities in their democratic societies, whether for good or for bad? Continue reading

Utomi’s Baffling Take on Soludo’s Bombshell

When Charles Soludo released his bombshell on the future of the political economy and state of Nigeria beyond the 2015 elections between Muhammadu Buhari and Goodluck Jonathan http://www.vanguardngr.com/2015/01/buhari-vs-jonathan-beyond-election-charles-soludo/ ,it contained a brilliant analysis of the economic conditions of the times blended with “politics” i.e. among other things, the “eulogy to Obasanjo as a master economic leader” which cannot be justified by facts or reason and the “hopelessness of the Nigerian situation” as if Nigerian politicians should not even try to bring about because of the paucity of resources. Continue reading

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