Corruption is the New Meaning of Life: It Is Here to Guide Us

Corruption is here in the world to stay, and it entrenches itself in our society deeper daily. Such is our most significant contemporary reality in times of peace and not in an emergency. It is even now legal. Corruption has paved the way for unnecessary and preventable wars, unrest, pestilence, systemic failures and emergencies. Many commentators brand such occurrences as unexpected contingencies. “Things happen”, is the persuasion we must believe, as if they occur with little or no calculated intention and help. The Covid-19 pandemic has exposed more corruption than is normally available to the average citizen. Backing ideologies, facilitators, and the consequences of corruption have become more visible to all. The media, criminal justice mechanisms, legislation and civil services could never offer the people such an accessible view of corruption in normal circumstances.

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Anticorruption in Nigeria Should Be About Better Social Organisation

Buhari v Cameron

This article starts and concludes with the following sentence. “Governance and corruption are essentially about social organisation on a scale that ranges from very good governance to very bad governance.” Very good governance regarding government and organisations does not necessarily suggest the absence of corruption but very bad governance is typically characterised by serious corruption. It is important to focus on the definitions, approaches, perspectives and logics of corruption as long as they are appropriate. However, it is unfortunate when the purpose of managing corruption with anticorruption is often forgotten; the improvement of social organisation or maintaining high standards of enforcement. Social organisation at its root is the ‘collective action’ of two or more people. As the numbers of people organised increase so do the complexity of its management. Continue reading

Corruption: One and a Half Questions

Since the widely preferred mode of organisation (partial or encompassing) for our “globalised political economy” in both public and private spheres is corruption, how are useful and successful anti-corruption programs going to produce “better governance” or “cleaner governance” or “good government” or “good corporations”? Who will implement and sustain these anti-corruption programs?

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