When I Last Saw Simon Hughes

Thursday, two weeks ago I had just come out of hospital after a two-week stay there. As a resident of a Bermondsey, my brother wheeled me to the shops. As we got to the former Santander Bank premises on Southwark Park Road, then turned into the headquarters of the Simon Hughes Liberal Democrats Return campaign, we bumped into the man. Simon Hughes was all alone carrying a large cardboard box out of the headquarters and headed for a yellow-painted black cab which he was known to drive. My brother and I greeted Hughes, but he barely responded, he looked unhappy. Hughes is usually a cheerful and accessible person. The June 8 elections had just ended, and the former MP had lost. It was a very personal irony for me, a very difficult one. I did not want Simon Hughes to come back as my MP.

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Tony Blair and the Unusual Case of Campbell’s Law

When sociologist Donald T Campbell came up with his eponymous Law, one wonders if he expected it to be of theoretical or practical use. Campbell’s Law states that “the more any quantitative social indicator is used for social decision-making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures and the more apt it will be to distort and corrupt the social processes it is intended to monitor.” Originally intended to measure crime rates and other social phenomena, it has been in also in use in corruption studies. Tony Blair, as Prime Minister of Great Britain, is exemplary as a textbook case of Campbell’s Law.

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Reflections on the May Elections: The Relevance of Voters?

Never underestimate the wisdom of the old saying, “what Britain needs is another good war”. Peace, jobs, wages, NHS are boring and appear to be responsible for the national malaise in British politics. Or are they? The May 5th local elections are over, and the June 8th general election is on its way.

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Who Has Ever Seen The Nigerian Declaration of Independence?

NDI

It may thoroughly surprise most Nigerians that there are disturbing questions as to who has ever seen and read the contents of whatever document the “Nigerian Declaration of Independence” (NDI) is a part if it does not stand alone. It would be the document that contains the actual terms and conditions of the Independence of Nigeria from Britain, the handover conditions not some bill. If Nigeria does have a duly signed and legitimate NDI, how come no one seems to have ever seen it even 56 years after Independence. Or is it best kept as a secret?

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