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The Cycle of Good Education and Strong Institutions
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The Cycle of Good Education and Strong Institutions

Formal education is one of the most overrated things in human development people on the African continent can gain, maybe elsewhere too. Education in the formal sense is an “institutional thing,” i.e. the stuff of institutions. It is not just the stuff of classrooms and ivory towers. Institutions rely on education and education has to be meet institutional and societal requirements through governance for it to serve any useful purpose in society. The symbiosis of institutions and education is both valuable and undeniable. In a nation where institutions are unenforceable, we must expect the education curriculum to be inadequate in many senses. Education is not just the acquisition skills but also the awareness of the requirements of civil participation in a just or improving society.

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Urhobo Blow (UB): A True Martial Art and Sport?

Urhobo Blow (UB): A True Martial Art and Sport?

Urhobo Blow (UB), Ubi ejeh [service of punches] or Ohonre r’ubi [battle of punches], is a traditional martial art developed by the Urhobos for military action, but in recent times, it became a contest of strength by young males at annual or seasonal festivals. UB has its similarities with mainstream boxing, but the differences are steep. Many ethnic groups in Africa have their own boxing and wrestling arts. Still, the distinct feature of UB is that fighters place their knock-out punch hand on their backs just above the buttocks during fights. UB is over the years is becoming extinct due to lack of interest and exposure, but may make a big comeback as a mixed martial art of international status. UB was once a source of great community pride and made heroes. So, what makes UB worthy of attention? Read More “Urhobo Blow (UB): A True Martial Art and Sport?”

RE: The Imminent Collapse of Nigeria’s Power Privatisation
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RE: The Imminent Collapse of Nigeria’s Power Privatisation

http://eyoekpo.com/post/101658521484/the-imminent-collapse-of-nigerias-power-privatisation

I found Timi Soleye’s piece in the Financial Times interesting. The Financial Times and its editors would have a lot to lose by way of reputation if Soleye produced a story on the privatisation of the electric power sector in Nigeria without facts and which could be readily debunked by counter-facts. Newspaper articles are often constrained by word count limits necessitating summaries. Does one have to represent hidden vested interests to write what they think or observe?

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