What Has Conservative Ideology Got to Do with Covid-19?

Ideology can be such a blinding and narrow-minded state of mind, individually or collectively. Accurate history informs us that plagues and pandemics have devastated the world several times and for millennia, long before socialism and capitalism came into existence and the human race is still here. But not because of the excessive passions that drive ideology. My conservative friends of Nigerian origin seem to think otherwise. Continue reading

The “Babangida Must Go” Protests: A Missed Opportunity for Revolution

Young, obscure student leaders initially led the best chance of a revolution Nigeria had at the University of Benin campus in May 1989. These young leaders staged a protest that became famously known as the “Anti-SAP Riots”. This protest-turned-riot, spilt into Benin-City and rapidly to other cities in Nigeria including Lagos, Port Harcourt and Ibadan. The masses were firmly behind the student protesters. The people bought the persuasive message of the obscene leadership corruption and thoroughgoing military repression. However, it was the rejection of neoliberalism that was mercilessly impoverishing the majority of Nigerians that spurred the citizenry. The people and the student protest were one people with a united aim. The guns of the repressive military regime no longer frightened the masses; they had nothing left to lose.

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Reflections on the May Elections: The Relevance of Voters?

Never underestimate the wisdom of the old saying, “what Britain needs is another good war”. Peace, jobs, wages, NHS are boring and appear to be responsible for the national malaise in British politics. Or are they? The May 5th local elections are over, and the June 8th general election is on its way.

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2017: “Saint Buhari” and More Economic Stagnation

The trouble with Nigeria is simply and squarely a failure of leadership. There is nothing basically wrong with the Nigerian character. There is nothing wrong with the Nigerian land or climate or water or air or anything else – Chinua Achebe

In the year 2017, Nigeria’s economy is predictably going stagnate further without recourse to rescue. Maslow’s ‘hierarchy of needs’ will be mostly only fulfilled at the bottom level in the nation. The imminent threat of mass hunger will eventually overtake the ‘Nigerian genius’ of denying hunger when living with sharply decreasing calorie intake over time. Stuff higher than food and water will be harder to acquire or keep. Hopes for improving personal prosperity have never been higher but the economic, cultural and political climate has never been so decisively forbidding. Business opportunities, profits, employment, ethical credit, education, exchange rates are all facing steep decline.  It is all, sadly, a problem of leadership and the “Household of Buhari” is a big part of the problem. Continue reading

Buhari’s Choice and the Expected “Fashola Miracle”

buhari fashola

When President Muhammadu Buhari won the 2015 general elections, he did so largely with the support of neutral and anti-PDP (Peoples Democratic Party) commentators. Everything bad in Buhari’s life history was to be forgotten and everything good was in ascendance. From another perspective, it was very difficult for practitioners of competent thinking to justify the pervasive profligacy behemoth of PDP while in power. The ministerial appointments Babs Fashola, Timi Amaechi and other ‘gubernatocrats’ that took more than half a year to make that was the start of the negation of support for President Buhari. Many thinking men deserted except the likes of Wole Soyinka turned their backs on and pens against Buhari. But many political miracles were promised by the Buhari government. Where are they? Continue reading

The Sambo Scandal & the “Owners of Nigeria”

dasuki  Nigeria

The “Sambo Scandal” (concerning one Col Sambo Dasuki) is just another story when compared to the full scale of looting in Nigeria; it’s just ‘Hot Air’ and Hollywood. The Government of Nigeria (GON) since the military regime of Yakubu Gowon has squandered around $1 trillion on nothing but personal enrichment and the provision of mostly shoddy goods and services to Nigerians. Call it the “national cake” (that has no bakery) or the “pot of soup” (that has no kitchen), Nigeria’s wealth is on a daily basis being shared like cake and soup at parties for and by the “Owners of Nigeria Technostructure” (ONT) and at their very own imperturbable convenience. This situation is incredibly far beyond the stilted fanaticisms of All Progressives Congress (APC) and People’s Democratic Party (PDP) supporters. Continue reading

Is the TSA a Panacea to Corruption?

Ngozi_Okonjo_Iweala_Presents_Budget

The Treasury Single Account (TSA) was adopted by Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, a diehard neoliberal, while she was Minister of Finance under the presidency of Goodluck Jonathan. The TSA a monetary tool introduced to reduce the cost of borrowing in a debt-stricken neoliberal world and ensure idle or unused monies by government agencies do not sit in accounts. The introduction of the TSA into the Nigerian system of economic management has nothing to do with the intelligence or sensibilities of either Goodluck Jonathan or President Muhammadu Buhari; it is a “compulsory” International Monetary Fund (IMF) instruction. Is the TSA an effective anti-corruption tool though or not? Continue reading

Devalued Naira or Devalued Republic?

One Naira

Nigeria is still in its “supposed” anti-corruption mode from a governance perspective, but the current state of the economy is not going to permit its success no matter how hard the country tries or well-meaning the leaders might be. There is a highly overlooked aspect of corruption that directly results from macro-economic requirements, whether it is self-determined or imposed by multilateral agencies. The devaluation of currencies particularly in developing countries exacerbates the incidence of corruption. Continue reading

Is it Not Time to Privatise the Three Arms of the Nigerian Government?

hand-in-oil-pollution-nigeria-Amnesty-Intl

It is amazing to hear that the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation’s refineries are to be sold due to inefficiency and under-performance problems if a self-set 30-day government ultimatum is not met. This is the same NNPC that is supposed to be the only concrete evidence that President Muhammadu Buhari is doing a good job. Ibe Kachikwu, NNPC’s new General managing Director, is even portrayed as some Nigerian equivalent of Jack Welch, a great American super-CEO. Yet, privatisation is the most possible solution to the refineries failing performance, especially when it comes to fuel provisions. The logic of governance is failing Nigeria’s management disastrously and common sense is appearing to be increasingly uncommon the higher one goes. Continue reading

The Owners of Nigeria Technostructure (ONT)

In Nigeria there exists a non-market non-governmental extortionist technostructure that is nameless but for the purpose of convenience we shall call it the ONT (i.e. the Owners of Nigeria Technostructure). Continue reading

Nigeria Tested by Choice: Buhari or Jonathan or No One?

The 2015 elections in Nigeria are about Muhammadu Buhari of APC and Goodluck Jonathan of PDP. Those who are not voting will be voting for ‘no one’. Voting for ‘no one’ is legitimate in a democracy. Beyond the relevance games, rumours, slander, seditions, insults, accusations, libel, smears, cross-carpeting, campaigns, anti-campaigns and all what not, on Election Day people will vote. I suspect the choice of candidate to be voted for will be based mostly on ethnicity, [political] ricism, religion and beer parlour logic or mai chai corner consensus. It would have been better if the elections were based on a rational basis. Continue reading

A Response to “Political Party Funding & Nigerians”

http://atamssokari.wordpress.com/2014/10/16/political-party-funding-nigerians/comment-page-1/#comment-90

If I may extend your argument, there was a time when political party funding was ethical (enough). This was the period after World War II up to the 1970s manly in the developed world. The current unethical nature of political party funding is not peculiar to Nigeria since it all started and blossomed in some of the world’s oldest democracies. The reasons for the transition from ‘legitimate ethical’ to ‘legalised unethical’ party funding are numerous but a few will touched on here. Continue reading

Nigeria: The Empire That Never Was… Will It Ever Be?

Nigeria
Sir John Glubb’s enduring claim to fame, perhaps among other things, is an essay he titled “The Fate of Empires and Search for Survival“. Having been an adept historian as well as military commander for the British empire in its twilight days he understood something worthy about the rise and fall of empires. His career started at a time it was believed the sun would never set on the British empire and he witnessed to the rise American and Soviet empires while the British dominion faded. Are there any lessons for Nigeria and other African nations in Glubb’s observations?
Empire typically moves from one dominant power to another over time and so on. Glubb explained in his essay to be the result of unmistakable cycles of stages an empire goes through from its inception to its collapse. These stages or ages are [1];

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To Cook a Continent: A Review and a Comment

REVIEW:
To Cook a Continent: Destructive Extraction and Climate Crisis in Africa is yet another book about Africa’s exploitation but with a significant difference from all others. The author presents the challenge “what can be done now to end destructive exploitation in Africa?”. This is a far more superior and immediate question than “what can we do for Africa?” in which tomorrow never comes; every day, every year, every decade is always now. Continue reading

Corruption in Nigeria: Is it Curable? Part Three

The Owners of Nigeria Technostructure

In Nigeria, there exists a non-market non-governmental extortionist technostructure that is nameless, but for convenience, we shall call it the ONT (i.e. the Owners of Nigeria Technostructure). The ONT is somewhat implicated in existing in the works of many authors (Dudley 1982; Agbese 1990; Diamond 1991; Osoba 1993, 1996; Cayford 1996; Ake 1996; Ihonvbere 1996, 1999; Smith 2001; Oduyela 2004; Madichie 2005; Asobie 2006; Omotola 2006; Oarhe 2010). Analogous to the concept of the market technostructure propounded by John Kenneth Galbraith in which corporate bureaucrats had more power than shareholders, and the focus of corporate activity was more on survival than profits. The ONT holds more power than market shareholders/leaders and government administrators, respectively or combined, and is focused on the survival of the nation’s economy to serve it interests rather than national prosperity (see Asobie 2006). It is a fact that citizens of Nigeria are also shareholders (or stakeholders) in the economy.

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