morality

Sapele’s Female Druggies and their Babies

Sapele’s Female Druggies and their Babies

Imagine a baby just a few days or old. He or she has been crying for food endlessly, but nothing is on offer. There is no money for baby food, so the mother has to feed the child with her breast’s milk. How ever, the delay that kept the baby hungry was because she is taking time to inject, swallow or smoke drugs. The baby’s nourishment from the mother’s breast may be laced with varying concentrations of drugs. That is the baby’s meal and survival. We are not even talking about how well-fed the mother is, the child’s immunity, health and treatment if it falls ill, the environment the mother and child lives, hopes of a better life and so forth. One may further ask if the child is the only one, or the second or third or if another one is on the way? Look at the photo above, and you can see a mother simultaneously smoking marijuana and feeding her baby. It is happening in Sapele, Delta State like in many other towns and cities in Nigeria, particularly the slum areas, but the usual denial by many Nigeria is that the photo was taken in South Africa, Gabon or Chad. Drugs are not just destroying a generation of youths; it is already destroying their babies.

Read More “Sapele’s Female Druggies and their Babies”

| |

Literature in Schools Poisoned the “Nigeria Mind”

It is easy to deride Nigeria and Nigerians because there are ample bases for it and its often convenient; “Nigeria is a Nation of Thieves” as Colin Powell once said or “Nigeria is a Nation of 419ers” or “Nigeria is the most Corrupt Nation in the World” etc. Such derision about Nigeria is mostly about deception and corruption. Unsurprisingly, these vices can be said to be surreptitiously caused in the national primary education institution of the 1970s onwards, attributable to the “New Oxford English Course Reader” (NOECR); the only literature, virtually poison, available to Nigerian primary school kids in the curriculum. Read More “Literature in Schools Poisoned the “Nigeria Mind””

Corruption in Nigeria: Is It Curable? Part One
| |

Corruption in Nigeria: Is It Curable? Part One

The Nigerian nation might not be a failed state but it is certainly by all ostensible standards of politics and governance a true kakistocracy. Nigeria’s condition of kakistocracy is a function of corruption and moral decadence. It is a truism to say corruption is a major societal ill in Nigeria blighting its way of life; Nigeria is a certainly bandits’ nation. Hitherto, Transparency International perennially ranked Nigeria as one of the most corrupt nations in the world for a number of years but the recent ranking of the nation as being a much less corrupt from practical experience and common sense appears at best to be dubious. Read More “Corruption in Nigeria: Is It Curable? Part One”

Good for the People, Good for Everybody
|

Good for the People, Good for Everybody

Lawrence Cook in The Spy Who Sat On The Doorstep (Courtesy IMDB)

I remember from the mid to late 70s, Sacro Ogban, a cool, sociable, and trendy guy I admired for his personality and style. About 12 years older than me, he was light-skinned and had a close resemblance to Larry Cook, star of the movie, The Spook Who Sat At The Doorstep and a similar persona. Sacro would always make a toast at some stage during drinking sessions with his friends, a regular event. The wording of the toast was constant, said with a hint of a Harlem, New York accent, “That which is good for the people is good for everybody” or sometimes “What is good for the people is good for everybody”; he used the latter version more often. The meaning or context of the toast was obscure to me but always met with effortless acceptance from his friends. Yes, the toast made little sense to my preteen mind, but it was catchy. In 1978, he left Orerokpe, where both our parents lived and went overseas for studies. Read More “Good for the People, Good for Everybody”