Sapele’s Female Druggies and their Babies

Imagine a baby just a few days or old. He or she has been crying for food endlessly but nothing is on offer. There is no money for baby food, so the mother has to feed the child with her breast’s milk. How ever, the delay that kept the baby hungry was because she taking time to inject, swallow or smoke drugs. The baby’s nourishment from the mother’s breast may be laced with varying concentrations of drugs. That is the baby’s meal and survival. We are not even talking about how well fed the mother is, the child’s immunity, health and treatment if it falls ill, the environment the mother and child lives, hopes of a better life and so forth. One may further ask if the child is the only one, or the second or third or if another one is on the way? Look at the photo above and you can see a mother simultaneously smoking marijuana and feeding her baby. It is happening in Sapele, Delta State like in many other towns and cities in Nigeria, particularly the slum areas, but the usual denial by many Nigeria is that the photo was taken in South Africa, Gabon or Chad. Drugs are not just destroying a generation of youths, it is already destroying their babies. Continue reading

Oppression as a Test: Some Questions

Knowing that one is living with oppression is a blessing whenever it decides to come, not knowing is a curse that will forever leave one much worse off. – G Nane

Before attempting to answer a few interesting questions arising from readers of the article Oppression as a Test: A Metaphor for the Nigerian Youth (https://wp.me/p1bOKH-P5), it is important to explain a simple taxonomy of oppression.

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#FreeEse: A Tragedy or Hot Air?

pedophile victim

It is interesting to hear what pundits have to say about the “sexual relationship” between the adult male, Yinusa, and Ese Oruru a 13-year-old girl said to have been abducted by the former since 2012. Concerning the event in question, there is much talk about endemic injustice, an ineffectual police force and legal system, unconcerned politicians and unscrupulous predatory males within the borders of Nigeria. What is not being said is that poverty has reduced females in Nigeria even seriously under-aged ones into “purchasable” sex objects either as goods or services.  Ese’s case was just a popular one out of millions. Continue reading

“Women’s Rights” as Theme of African Union Summit: Really?

african-women

When the leaders of Africa unite in congress to discuss the problems of the continent, whatever is tabled is usually the stuff of the “impossible, good for utterance only”. These discussions are mostly superficial rhetoric used to give some respectability and fame to those self-appointed African champions who promote them. Nevertheless, you can be sure that there will be no concrete and effective instrumental or institutional changes implemented to provide the necessary solutions to the problems at hand. The problems thus persist unless there is some foreign intervention. The 26th Ordinary Session of the Assembly of the Union with the theme “Women’s Rights in Africa”, is no different. Continue reading

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