Fraternities Are Viruses In Nigeria 13 – The Disintegration

The most extreme poisoning cases in history
The leading University Campus Grown Fraternities (UCGF) have had a long run of durability in their existence. Like many glorified dictatorships, autocracies and predatory cults, their enduring survival is a function of the longevity of the founder or historical leader. There is no retirement- some are late and some are present.
The “cult of personality” of the historical leader prevents the development of consistent and well-enforced institutions, laws or rules within the UCGF. His changing moods, whims and preferences rule the UCGF as he pleases. The challenges to his inconsistencies are few and attract punitive sanctions. The outcome is that the UCGF is always in a state of permanent uncertainty; every member has to wait for the latest deceptions, half-truths, excuses, threats, punishments, exclusions or instructions of the leader to know what will happen next. Keeping members guessing is one of the most ancient tricks of cult leaders. The problem resulting is that the cult leader never lives forever. He will eventually become too ill or senile to lead, or he will pass away someday. That is when the succession battles and disintegration begin; he never thought any successor a good enough replacement. The scramble for power on his departure can be desperate and violent – many will eat and drink poison.

Continue reading

Oppression as a Test: A metaphor for the Nigerian Youth

Those who have come to know and trust death embrace it with love. It is the very foundation of freedom. Oppressors love no one, not their wives, not their children, not their friends. How can such a person love death? Behind the empty shell of the oppressor, he fears all the real tests of his worth that are imminent.” – Guynes
Oppression is a test or testing event. Some strange men habitually oppress others, and they commonly do so by the actual practice or simulations of “bone testing”. Bone testing works because it is the violent use of bones by those who claim to be “strong” [bullies?] and can in varying degrees damage the bones, muscles, tissues, and nerves of others, thus securing their submission. Bone testing not only causes ache and hurt, but it also can maim and kill too. Why would the oppressed and opressable not fear it? Such is the stuff of oppression; inducing fear. All resistance breaks down. The next level of oppression is the use of “word testing”. The words of mouth are perhaps the most effectively used human instrument of domination known, mainly, where the hypocrisy of peace and doing good exists. It is the domain of intimidation, scaremongering, perplexity and verbal dehumanisation on the one hand. And deception, persuasion, feel-good-factors and the sale of hope on the other. It is also oppression by mind-control. All dissent or oppositions takes a crushing. Bone and word testing as used to oppress are very physical and psychological, respectively, derived from a wide array of evil incentives.

Continue reading

Pastor Suleiman is Carrying the Can for CAN

 

It is highly regrettable that the controversial Christian clergyman, Johnson Suleiman, of the Omega Fire Ministries International used a sermon at his church at a Sunday service to practically incite violence against Fulani Herdsmen. It was a tit-for-tat statement, not the stuff of Christian preacher. He knew what he was doing, but his remarks might fail the “Brandenburg Test” making them speech offences. In a nation were at least half of the 170 million citizens are very angry but also very helpless about the Fulani Herdsmen problem, the question is how much blame can we ascribe to Suleiman for his unfortunate sermon? Continue reading

Why is Anyone Surprised at the #SouthernKadunaGenocide?

Southern Kaduna Massacres are the stuff Nigeria is made of. Before anyone dismisses such a claim, we have to examine the pervasive ‘value of life’ in Nigeria to both ordinary citizens and the government as well as the cost of ‘taking life’ in Nigeria; ‘life’ here mainly refers to that of the ‘underdog’ [the weaker Nigerian by dichotomy]. Religion and oil politics have led to the biggest massacres in Nigeria’s history, including the Civil War, but life is taken daily with sudden and unexpected spontaneity everywhere in the country for innumerable reasons, some totally inane. Tragically, unless the United Nations, Amnesty International or some heavyweight foreign NGO takes interest in the matter, Nigeria’s leaders, politicians and intellectuals simply ignore the problem. The White Man’s Burden all over again, in another dimension?

Continue reading

Fraternities are Viruses in Nigeria: Part 8 – The Bounty Takers

naira-c

 

Fraternities in Nigeria are now specialists in accumulating “financial bounties” with their leaders appropriating them; it is tantamount to corporate malfeasance. It may be unfortunate if not tragic that while the founders of University Campus Grown Fraternities (UCGFs) established them, perhaps for noble intentions, they have come to embody the very antics of “corporate malfeasance”. Operating just below the radar or not facing criminal prosecution is not evidence of clean hands. UCGFs depend mainly on the money members contribute and as their sizes have increased so has their kitties. Financial bounty taking by leaders in UCGFs is strictly about misappropriating members’ money and funders’ largesse, perennially. The bounty taking activities of UCGFs did not start one day or overnight. The bounties came in phases and often took years or decades to perfect. The bounties are now known as “returns.”

Continue reading

Fulani Herdsmen are Spies

Armed-fulani-herdsman

Fulani herdsmen have always secretly been subversives monitoring and reporting activities throughout the length and breadth of Nigeria and they have paymasters; so my source affirms. This information, however, does not explain the ostensibly ‘senseless phenomenon’ happening frequently in Nigeria today; the killing/kidnapping of Nigerians all over the country by Fulani herdsmen. The long-hidden history of Fulani herdsmen grazing their cattle all over Nigeria should no longer be a secret. Continue reading

Oba Akiolu and King Zwelithini: Different Persons, Different Subjects

Oba-of-Lagos

I am shocked crapious that certain people are making strong and equivalent comparisons between Oba Akiolu and King of Zululand for recent ethnocentric utterances they have made. There is no comparison in their cases, personally and demographically. There are different logics to the utterances. Continue reading

Violence in Mandelaland: Why?

Violence in South Africa

‘Mandelaland’, the land of Nelson Mandela, a Xhosa, is the Republic of South Africa. Mandeland is very far from being Mandela-like in any conception whatsoever. The experience of non-South African Africans in Mandelaland since the fall of Apartheid has been economically rewarding for most but also dangerous for most. The recent violence by South African Blacks against foreign Blacks is a gaping chink in Mandela’s overly “canonised” image. Continue reading

The Near Death Experience of a Petite Man

Tomos was a petite man in his 40s and could easily pass for a young teenager sometimes. Usually very smartly dressed in formal attire to look much older than his boyish appearance, he was on his way to revel with friends at a house warming party in Walworth, South East London. He had to walk a very long distance to get to the party since though dressed like a toff with an elegant suit, shiny shoes and a cravat, he could not afford bus or taxi fares. His masked intention of attending the party was ‘financial edification’; seeking bad loans and grants. Professionally, Tomos was an architect but had never designed a structure in his life. Somehow it was tough for him to get his act together. His mind was far too nefarious and preoccupied malevolent actions to hold a job in a professional setting. Enduring cooperation, collaboration and team skills were things he lacked. He was more excellent in the art of disruption, sabotage, mischief and chaos. You could comfortable rely on him to mess a good job up or bring a good man down.

Continue reading

Nigeria’s “Tale of Two Election Day Silences”

There was considerable peace and “silence” during the 2015 Nigerian general elections yesterday. It was good news that apart from the “I am above the law” behaviour of some senior politicians there might have been no incidences of chaos or violence at all. The inefficiencies of (Independent National Electoral Commission) INEC would have usually caused alarm but Nigerians demonstrated they can be patient, tolerant, well-behaved and disciplined in the face of delays, procrastination and uncertainty like any other nationals. Really! Nigerians silent when they would usually vex and “rake”? Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: