The NLC to Blame for Corruption?

Blamocracy backed up by ephemerally successful public relations is both the signature and dominant mode of governance by the current government of President Muhammadu Buhari. With the president off the scene on an “extended holiday” his Vice President, Prof Yemi Osinbajo, is carrying on the tradition of blamocracy unrelentingly. The President and the road sweeper miraculously became “We” in Osinbajo’s rhetoric, yes undifferentiated equals. The everyday Nigerian does not feel that “We” in any sense whatsoever. Nevertheless, at a meeting the day before yesterday with the executives of the Nigerian Labour Congress (NLC) et al, of the many things he diligently lectured them about for hours, Osinbajo  very sneakily shifted blamed on them for being “silent” even “complicit” in the corruption viciously ravaging Nigeria. We are all responsible period. Continue reading

Can President Buhari Still Change Nigeria?

 

 

An interview of Grimot Nane on the immediate political future of Nigeria by freelancer Opey Sonto, September 15th 2016.

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Osagie Ize-Iyamu Was A Pyrate, So What?

There are very few people on record who have been more critical of University Campus Grown Fraternities (UCGFs) in Nigeria, including the National Association of Seadogs (NAS) a.k.a. the Pyrates Confraternity (PC) than myself. I have written a score of articles [on this publication] that question the existence, motives, evolution and modus operandi of UCGFs with conclusions that are clearly damning. I am neither a defender nor supporter of UCGFs. We may, however, take strong exception to Governor Adams Oshiomhole (APC) using the [former] membership of NAS in a smear campaign against Osagie Ize-Iyamu, from an opposing party (PDP), to get him disqualified / discredited in the dying minutes of the (now postponed) 2016 Edo State gubernatorial elections. Continue reading

Senators: Enacting Laws to Make Corruption Profitable

Saraki Nwaoboshi

Corruption is essentially a phenomenon that is highly secretive mostly because its perpetrators seek to avoid the consequences of detection, prosecution and conviction. In Nigeria, and for a long time corruption in high places has been both visible and morally-neutral because of the generous guarantee of impunity public officials readily enjoy. However, the impunity guaranteed by government inertia appears to be insufficient for thieving public officials. Nowadays, lawmakers actually enact bills to destroy those who have the temerity to detect, expose or prosecute their very own cases of corruption and enact bills to immunise themselves against detection and prosecution. Is there not supposed to be a “War Against Corruption” (WAC) going on in Nigeria? Continue reading

Political Ambitions in Diaspora: ‘Obasanjo Say Make I Come’

nigeriansProtest

Between 1999 and 2007 there was an acute frenzy of political aspirations occurring among Nigerians in diaspora; it was quite an evident wave. The frenzy was about Nigerians seeking to return home to go successfully into politics and hold office or get lucrative contracts from the government. Pre-1999, many if not the majority of Nigerian males in diaspora were quite content to live indefinitely overseas but after the 1999 return to democracy, it was rare to find a Nigerian male who was ‘away’ that did not want to return to Nigeria to make it big. That was the birth of the “X say make I come home” era.

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