Posts Tagged ‘democracy’

There has been too much optimism invested in what is widely touted in Nigeria as the ‘dividends of democracy’ i.e. the benign and enabling outcomes of democracy. After 18 years of a return to democracy in Nigeria, the dividends of democracy on offer has only meant the military are no longer in government. The dividends have neither been delivered in the form of better leadership nor better governance. Unsurprisingly, the crisis of leadership in Nigeria cannot be solved by democracy as a system all by itself. In fact, democracy can fail societies terribly. (more…)

Never underestimate the wisdom of the old saying, “what Britain needs is another good war”. Peace, jobs, wages, NHS are boring and responsible for the national malaise in politics. Or are they? The May 5th local elections are over and the June 8th general election is on its way.  (more…)

Whether university campus grown fraternities (UCGF) have done either good or evil to societies in their countries of origin (e.g. the USA) is debatable. American-style, without idealisation, their “honour codes” are both formidable and strictly adhered; “honour” among brothers matter inestimably. Interestingly, their Nigerian imitators as ‘free-for-all fraternities’ are observably oblivious to very meaning of honour and devoid of working honour codes. This may be the reason UCGFs in Nigeria are more like “street gangs” than collectives of educated men. (more…)

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In the arena of corruption, especially at the grand level where billions of dollars are stolen as a rule of thumb, secrecy and cover-ups are two of the most dominant factors. Many of the world’s great scandals relating to corruption are found out by mistake or whistle-blowing. Once in a while trifling investigations into some minor malfeasance or routine crime ends up unexpectedly uncovering some case of grand corruption. A peripheral component of major corruption may seem frivolous by those who choose to see it so, but how about the main act? (more…)

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Fela once called them vagabonds in power, VIPs. It now seems they are cowards in government, CIGs – Guynes

One really has to consider the resounding cowardice of Nigerian leaders with the monopoly of violence at their disposal since the end of the Civil War in 1970. There has been a combination of mobile police led-repression, instances of “mad dog syndrome” whereby soldiers take on ‘self-appointed license’ to punish civilians with unrestrained heavy handedness and blatant military massacres during both stratocratic and democratic administrations. In all these cases the victims are defenceless and unarmed citizens. However, why is it that when Nigerian leaders are faced by competent armed groups under their jurisdiction who readily take offensive initiative against the military they cannot be fight back successfully? (more…)